CPF public relations officer Kashiefa Mohammed said there was deep concern about the ongoing violence in the community and the initiatives were in response to ongoing crime. Picture: supplied.
CPF public relations officer Kashiefa Mohammed said there was deep concern about the ongoing violence in the community and the initiatives were in response to ongoing crime. Picture: supplied.

Hanover Park safety structures ready for any festive season high jinks

By Nomalanga Tshuma Time of article published Dec 2, 2021

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Cape Town - Hanover Park community safety structures are gearing up to launch a series of crime prevention initiatives with a difference ahead of the expected peak of crime occurrences over the festive season.

Hanover Park Community Policing Forum in partnership with 11 local neighbourhood watches, anti-crime organisations and social activists, has begun putting in motion its planned community safety projects specially designed to tackle the festive crime fervour expected to hit the local community over the next few weeks.

The collective will on Friday host its first community engagement campaign, an anti-violence demonstration around the community, followed by the launch of the community's very own crime statistics report on Saturday.

CPF public relations officer Kashiefa Mohammed said there was deep concern about the ongoing violence in the community and the initiatives were in response to, and a stance against, ongoing crime.

“The murder of that young woman sparked something deep within us all, especially seeing as how we are currently observing 16 Days of Activism Against the Abuse of Women and Children.

“The walkabout and the other anti-crime programmes we intend to host is our way of directly tackling the ongoing violence and crime in our community,” Mohammed said.

CPF vice-chairperson Yaseen Johaar said: “On Saturday, we will be launching our crime statistics collected during the year. We recorded them privately, supported by a criminologist, because we felt that the statistics recorded by the SAPS did not paint the complete picture of crime in our community and that this prevented us from instituting the correct response needed to address the situation.

“With our stats, we will be able to tell which areas, and during which time of the year do which interventions need to be instituted and what sort of resources are needed,” Johaar said.

Mohammed will next week host 100 mothers who lost their children to gang violence at a commemorative event.

“I lost my son to gang violence 4 years ago. Although time has passed, the pain and trauma of it remains. Over the years I started hosting the Cycle of Women, a project where I work with mothers who lost their children to gang violence to help them work through the trauma of it,” Mohammed said.

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